Local Food, Global Fun

Local Food, Global Fun

 
 
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Shannon Brines and Eliot Jackson stopped by the studio to shamelessly plug the Local Food Summit, which—wouldn’t you know it—is happening this Saturday, February 16.

Shannon is a local farmer and manager of the Environmental Spatial Analysis Laboratory at the UM School for Environment and Sustainability (SEAS). He was also there at the founding of the Summit and serving on the board of Slow Food Huron Valley. (Regular listeners may remember that we had a great conversation about local food with Shannon back in November.)

Eliot is a co-leader of this year’s Summit, with a day job as a research technician working on agroecology at SEAS.

We talked about the history and growth of the Summit, working towards inclusivity in the local food movement, and why our guests believe that anyone who eats should participate.

In the second half of the show we got into a heavier discussion about agroecology from both a research and practical, down-to-earth perspective.

Plants Are Good

Plants Are Good

 
 
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You heard it here first, folks! Last Friday, we invited Peter Pellitier into the studio to elucidate the multi-faceted relationship between plants and carbon dioxide. Peter is a current Ph. D. candidate at SEAS where he researches terrestrial ecology and mycorrhizal fungi. He explained that plants have increased their carbon dioxide uptake by 31% as compared to pre-industrial rates. Continue reading Plants Are Good

You Want the Good News or the Bad News First?

You Want the Good News or the Bad News First?

 
 
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Whatever your answer, we decided to start with a bit of good news. As we finished off the second week of the new year, the Hot In Here crew covered all things environmental, from the impacts of fast fashion trends to nuns karate-chopping incandescent light bulbs (full disclosure, this week’s tangents were sponsored by Ed’s empty stomach). Continue reading You Want the Good News or the Bad News First?

Justice, Economics, and the Environment Walk into a Bar… A Conversation with Dr. Sam Stolper

Justice, Economics, and the Environment Walk into a Bar… A Conversation with Dr. Sam Stolper

 
 
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Many Americans hear the word “economics” and quite literally start to talk business: bulls and bears, stocks and bonds, revenues and profits—you know the drill. According to the Merriam-Webster dictionary, though, economics is “a social science concerned chiefly with description and analysis of the production, distribution, and consumption of goods and services.” For Dr. Sam Stolper, this meaning rings especially true when it comes to distribution. Sam is an assistant professor at the University of Michigan’s School for Environment and Sustainability (SEAS), where he researches and lectures on the intersecting issues of economics and environmental justice, particularly as they apply to how the impacts of energy use and production are distributed.  Continue reading Justice, Economics, and the Environment Walk into a Bar… A Conversation with Dr. Sam Stolper

Inside COP 24 with Alexa White

Inside COP 24 with Alexa White

 
 
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Ever wonder what actually goes on at an annual international climate change conference? Alexa White doesn’t. That’s because she’s attended the United Nations Framework Convention on Climate Change Conference of Parties (UNFCCC-COP) not once, but twice. She attended the 2015 talks in Paris, France and the ones that were held this month in Katowice, Poland. White is a second-year Ecology and Evolutionary Biology Ph.D. student. She was sent as a representative of the University of Michigan’s student delegation, organized by SEAS Professor Avik Basu. Continue reading Inside COP 24 with Alexa White

Young, Strong Voices from the Citizens’ Climate Lobby

Young, Strong Voices from the Citizens’ Climate Lobby

 
 
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Catherine Garton is not only a microbiology, applied statistics, and energy science & policy buff.  She’s also the founder of the Citizens’ Climate Lobby (CCL) chapter at the University of Michigan. The student group is part of a larger nonpartisan grassroots organization that aims to “build the political will for a livable world” by advocating for climate change solutions. Specifically, they support the implementation of a Carbon Fee and Dividend policy. Garton, a sophomore, founded the campus chapter only recently, but the umbrella organization has been active for over a decade and oversees 1,300+ chapters internationally. This week, co-hosts Logan and Heena talked with Catherine Garton and Lena Swirczek, another CCL student activist who is also involved in the University of Michigan’s Sustainable Living Experience, a sustainability-focused community at Oxford Houses on campus.  Continue reading Young, Strong Voices from the Citizens’ Climate Lobby

Know Your Farmer, Know Your Food

Know Your Farmer, Know Your Food

 
 
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Where did you collect your most recent grocery haul? Try to remember the items you hastily organized on the conveyor belt at check-out.  Now, where did all those come from?

1,500 is an important, if rarely recognized, number; it’s the average number of miles that produce travels on its way from an industrial farm to your dining room table. That is, unless you tend to shop for your produce locally.

Argus Farm Stop (or, “Argus,” if you’re familiar) is a business amalgam that can best be described as half “indoor farmers market” and half “hipster coffee shop/bakery.” The store features a cornucopia of produce, meat, and dairy grown by over 200 local farmers, 90% of whom are located within a 10 miles radius. Continue reading Know Your Farmer, Know Your Food

How did the Environment Fare in the Midterms?

How did the Environment Fare in the Midterms?

 
 
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On today’s show, the IHIH gang share their hot takes on what the recent midterm elections mean for the environment moving forward. Bella breaks down a special millage proposal in her native Ingham County that protects certain farmlands and open spaces against urban development, and the Ann Arborite in the room (Ed) shares his thoughts on the city’s passage of Proposal A, which nixes Mayor Christopher Taylor’s deal with Chicago-based developer Core Spaces in order to turn the city-owned Liberty Lot into an urban green space. 

Heena tells us about problems that some University of Michigan students had at the polls after registering with TurboVote in the weeks leading up to the election, and the whole crew updates listeners on several environmentally-focused proposals nationwide that were discussed on our October 26th show, including Florida’s Amendment 9, which conveniently bans both offshore drilling and indoor vaping, and Colorado’s Proposal 112, which would have required energy companies to drill farther away from private homes, schools, and hospitals.

You can find links to some of the other measures we covered in today’s show below:

Montana’s Initiative 186

Alaska’s Measure 1

Arizona’s Proposal 127

Nevada’s Question 6

Colorado’s Proposal 112

Colorado’s Amendment 74 

Florida’s Amendment 9 

Washington’s Initiative 1631

“Come of Age: The Case for Elderhood in a Time of Trouble” Author Stephen Jenkinson

“Come of Age: The Case for Elderhood in a Time of Trouble” Author Stephen Jenkinson

 
 
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On today’s show, we bring you a conversation between regular host Ed Waisanen and Stephen Jenkinson, author, teacher, storyteller, spiritual activist, and farmer.  His most recent book, “Come of Age: The Case for Elderhood in a Time of Trouble,” considers North America’s paradoxical relationship with elderhood as the region’s population continues to age yet fails to integrate intergenerational wisdom into its cultural consciousness during a time marked by a changing climate and sociopolitical unrest.

Stephen Jenkinson will be coming to the Eastern Michigan University’s Student Center in Ypsilanti as part of his “Nights of Grief and Mystery” tour.  You can find out more about Jenkinson on his website.

Plugging-in to Solar Energy

Plugging-in to Solar Energy

 
 
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Returning champions Meg, Logan, and Aurora discuss local ballot initiatives across the U.S. including carbon emissions fees in Washington, proactive water pollution prevention in Montana, fish protections in Alaska, a Floridian combo bill that intertwines vaping and off-shore drilling, and more! As an added bonus, the crew unveils their Halloween costumes for this year—and Aurora’s is quite chilling.

Also, Logan conducts his first interview with Chris Bowman, a graduate student at Michigan. Check out more details below:

Over the summer, Chris Bowman served as an intern for the Rocky Mountain Institute, a prestigious Colorado-based nonprofit that brands itself as a ‘think-and-do’ tank. There, he got plugged-into distribution grid work with solar energy cooperatives, of which there are just under 1,000 in the U.S. Specifically, Bowman focused his efforts on expanding and hastening the transition to renewable energy via market forces.

This fall, Bowman is back at Michigan continuing his graduate education as a proud, “Erber.” The Erb Institute is a dual-degree program through which students earn an MBA from the Ross School of Business as well as a master’s from the School for Environment and Sustainability over the course of three years. Bowman joined the program to gain a deeper understanding of the business, economics, and politics that set the stage for renewable energy markets to perform successfully. He speaks with fervor regarding the broadening transition to photovoltaics and renewables as our host Logan investigates a wide spectrum of topics, from front-of-the-meter generation to greater moral imperatives.