Tag Archives: Conservation

Learning from the Locals: Community-Based Conservation with Nils Christoffersen

This week’s It’s Hot Out There segment features an exclusive interview with Wallowa Resources Executive Director Nils Christoffersen. Our guest visited the School of Natural Resources and Environment for the Wyss Speaker Series to share his experiences with community based conservation in the American West.  Nils shared the Bundy militia standoff in Oregon as an example of how these conflicts represent the broader tensions between conservation and communities in the West.  Wallowa Resources has been working to provide communities with an alternative process for community-based management that helps overcome these conflicts.  With the final militia men turning themselves in on February 11th, this interview comes at an extremely relevant time. Continue reading Learning from the Locals: Community-Based Conservation with Nils Christoffersen

Financing Biodiversity Conservation: The Case of the Bird’s Head Seascape

This week’s broadcast debuts a new partnership between IHIH and Michigan Sustainability Cases (MSC), a new case-based learning platform which integrates podcasts into sustainability curriculum. Hosts Katie Browne and Andrea Kraus first speak with Laure Katz of Conservation International about her role managing the transition of the Bird’s Head Seascape, from donor-supported to fully financially self-sustaining — in four short years. Suffice to say the demands of such a challenge live little time for sleep.

We are then joined in studio by Peter Pellitier, a student of both coral and soil, who conducted research in Papua New Guinea and the Coral Triangle a year ago. Peter speaks to the importance of protecting marine biodiversity, as a foundation of livelihoods and buffer against climate change, and the difficulty of sustaining homegrown conservation initiative. Continue reading Financing Biodiversity Conservation: The Case of the Bird’s Head Seascape

Last Animals, Lasting Solutions for Conservation

This week on “It’s Hot in Here,” hosts Mike Burbidge, Claire Poelking, and Katie Browne continued with the second part of the Conservation Series with an in-depth discussion of ongoing efforts to curb poaching in Africa. Inspired by the visit of reknowned conservationist Craig Packer to the University of Michigan, we spoke with photojournalist and documentary filmmaker Kate Brooks about her first-hand experience at the epicenter of poaching, as well as with Drew Cronin, a researcher exploring how bushmeat off-take is affecting the abundance of primates in Equatorial Guinea. Continue reading Last Animals, Lasting Solutions for Conservation

Militarization of Conservation: Narratives of Poaching

In this week’s broadcast, we dive into a complicated and contentious issue, discussing the increasing militarization of conservation and anti-poaching efforts on the African continent, especially as they relate to broader anti-terrorism agendas.

Host Katie Browne, accompanied by first time co-hosts Mike Burbidge and Claire Poelking, introduce this week’s topic with discussion of the new Global Anti-Poaching Act (H.R.2494), currently under debate in the US Senate, which calls for support of anti-poaching efforts, strengthening of partner country capacity to counter wildlife trafficking, and designation of major wildlife trafficking countries. Continue reading Militarization of Conservation: Narratives of Poaching

The Greening of Social Work

This week’s environmental news, views, and grooves bring hosts Rebecca Hardin and Emily Durand to the world of social work. Through their discussions with Dr. Lucy Lawrence, professor of social work at Warren Wilson College in Asheville, NC, our hosts delve deep into the environmental movements happening in the field.

Here is a little background on the field of social work: it seeks to enhance the well-being of individuals, families, and communities through direct interaction. Also, individuals in this field strive to ensure social IMG_2688welfare and security for those affected by social disadvantages such as poverty or disabilities.  This week’s show runner Emily Durand, pictured, has first hand experience in this area of study and the field of environmental justice.

Continue reading The Greening of Social Work

Protecting Michigan Water

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Water conservation is the focus of this week’s show as we discussed conservation efforts in the White Lake area, invasive species and their effect on the local food supply, regulating levels of harmful chemicals like PCBs in the Great Lakes, the spotted gar, and more!

For more information about the dark past and revival of the White Lake watershed, go to:
http://www.detroitnews.com/article/20140626/METRO06/306260001

Continue reading Protecting Michigan Water

Growing Authentic Leaders from Communities Most Impacted by Environmental Injustice and Climate Change

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On this week’s show, our hosts Rebecca Hardin, Whitney Smith and Nicholas Bruscato discussed Growing Authentic Leaders from Communities Most Impacted by Environmental Injustice and Climate Change with the distinguished Dr. Robert Bullard – “The Father of Environmental Justice” and current Dean of the Barbara Jordan-Mickey Leland School of Public Affairs at Texas Southern University
What is Environmental Justice?
Environmental Justice is the fair treatment and meaningful involvement of all people regardless of race, color, national origin, or income with respect to the development, implementation, and enforcement of environmental laws, regulations, and policies (Environmental Protection Agency, 2015).
The Principles of Environmental Justice can be viewed here

Continue reading Growing Authentic Leaders from Communities Most Impacted by Environmental Injustice and Climate Change

Ecotourism

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Today’s show features Jimmy Chin, renowned North Face team Climber and Photographer, Will Weber, Founder of Journeys International and Returned Peace Corps Volunteer, and Benjamin Morse, SNRE MSc. student (2016) and Returned Peace Corps Volunteer.

Continue reading Ecotourism

Agroecology

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Dr. Marney Isaac, University of Toronto

It is 2015 and we are back! To kick off the new year on It’s Hot in Here, our hosts Rebecca Hardin and Sam Molnar discussed Agroecology with Dr. Marney Isaac, Assisant Professor and Canada Research Chair in Agroecosystems & Development at the University of Toronto.

Bio: Dr. Marney Isaac, Assistant Professor and Canada Research Chair in Agroecosystems & Development, conducts interdisciplinary research on plant strategies and the nutrient economy of agroecological systems while concurrently charting the human dimension of agroecosystem management. Her research provides mechanistic insights into the ecological principles, nutrient cycles, and plant-soil interactions that govern the structure and function of agricultural landscapes, with particular attention on identification of strategies for environmental services, system resilience and sustainable livelihoods. Her research approach makes use of a diverse set of technical tools and employs various temporal and spatial scales: from mechanistic manipulative trials at the rhizosphere scale to large agroecosystem dynamics. She also supervises an international research program investigating agrarian management networks and environmental governance, with an emphasis on understanding innovation in large social-agroecological systems. She has published widely in environmental science, agronomic and multi-disciplinary journals including Agriculture, Ecosystems & Environment, Agronomy for Sustainable Development and Ecology and Society.

Here is her website: http://blog.utsc.utoronto.ca/misaac/


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In addition to agroecology, we followed up with the SNRE MS students after their trip to Peru for the international climate negotiations at the United Nations Conference of Parties (COP20) in Lima, Peru. The SNRE students that we had on the show included second-year graduate students from the School of Natural Resources and Environment COP20 student delegation. We discussed their exciting experiences at one of the most prominent climate talks in the world.

Our show this week maintained a theme of innovation and taking new approaches to protect the environment and manage land. This segment was a wonderful start to the new year and we are excited for all that 2015 has to offer.

Growing Our Native Knowledge

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“It doesn’t take much reading about current events to find articles detailing the plight of migratory songbirds and butterflies like monarchs. Due to a variety of circumstances, but especially the loss of suitable feeding and breeding habitat, numbers have dropped significantly and there is no reason to believe that that course will be reversed unless we do something about it.

Fortunately, individual property owners can do something about it. Using a variety of trees, shrubs and herbaceous plants in your yard will help to provide resting and feeding spots for these critters, even if your yard is small. Continue reading Growing Our Native Knowledge