Tag Archives: Environmental Justice

Women’s March Follow-Up

In this episode of It’s Hot In Here, we catch up with some SNRE students who attended the Women’s March in Washington, D.C. a few weeks ago.

Hosts Malavika and Chris sat down with special guests Jillian and Emily to talk about attending the march, the aftermath of it, and how they want to keep the discussion going.

With topics including from environmental justice in the new administration, feminism, and what it means to be a part of a movement, this is a must-hear episode for anyone who considers themselves socially conscious.

We hope you enjoy this edition of It’s Hot in Here, and keep tuning in Fridays at noon on 88.3 WCBN-FM Ann Arbor!

Last Animals, Lasting Solutions for Conservation

This week on “It’s Hot in Here,” hosts Mike Burbidge, Claire Poelking, and Katie Browne continued with the second part of the Conservation Series with an in-depth discussion of ongoing efforts to curb poaching in Africa. Inspired by the visit of reknowned conservationist Craig Packer to the University of Michigan, we spoke with photojournalist and documentary filmmaker Kate Brooks about her first-hand experience at the epicenter of poaching, as well as with Drew Cronin, a researcher exploring how bushmeat off-take is affecting the abundance of primates in Equatorial Guinea. Continue reading Last Animals, Lasting Solutions for Conservation

Diversity Matters: The State of the Environmental Movement

This week, in honor of Martin Luther King Day, “It’s Hot in Here” brings you in-depth discussion of the state of diversity in the environmental movement and the University of Michigan. We kicked off the show with a brief review of the findings of the recently released report, “The State of Diversity in Environmental Organizations: Mainstream NGOs, Foundations, and Government Agencies,” spearheaded by Dr. Dorceta Taylor (SNRE) and the Green 2.0 Working Group.

Guests Beatriz Canas and Samantha Shattuck talk us through the implications of the report’s conclusion that, despite increasing racial diversity in the US, minorities remain underrepresented across the spectrum of environmental organizations. As a result, diversity tends to decrease as responsibility increases, with the “Green Insiders Club” remaining overwhelmingly white. Continue reading Diversity Matters: The State of the Environmental Movement

The Greening of Social Work

This week’s environmental news, views, and grooves bring hosts Rebecca Hardin and Emily Durand to the world of social work. Through their discussions with Dr. Lucy Lawrence, professor of social work at Warren Wilson College in Asheville, NC, our hosts delve deep into the environmental movements happening in the field.

Here is a little background on the field of social work: it seeks to enhance the well-being of individuals, families, and communities through direct interaction. Also, individuals in this field strive to ensure social IMG_2688welfare and security for those affected by social disadvantages such as poverty or disabilities.  This week’s show runner Emily Durand, pictured, has first hand experience in this area of study and the field of environmental justice.

Continue reading The Greening of Social Work

City Limits to Climate Change: Climate Justice from neighborhoods to negotiations

Today’s show, the second in a three part climate change series, discusses climate justice in cities from Detroit to Paris, site of the upcoming United Nations Conference of Parties on  Climate Change. In other news, the studio may just never have been this hot before; we were tempted to pour our water over our heads.
Continue reading City Limits to Climate Change: Climate Justice from neighborhoods to negotiations

Small Islands, Rising Seas

This week’s show begins a three part series on the topic of climate change. The first show in the set discusses the vulnerability of small islands. The second will consider cities as places that also reflect unjust risk distribution and vulnerability (whether through heat islands, or other phenomena). The third will consider climate adaptation strategies of Michigan’s cherry and grape producers.

Today’s island tour was conceived initially and researched by a team of UM Students including Miriam Butler, Matt Edelstein, Franny Melampy, Justin Petersmark, and Ella Tutlis . It comes to you through the voices of Dr. Rebecca Hardin (also known as Rebecca in the studio) Ed Waisanen, a first year SNRE masters student, and Harry Rice, a senior in Program in the Environment. There were quite a few good laughs in the segment, many stemming from the infamous teal shorts worn by Harry (see below) on such a cold fall day—islands ho!
Continue reading Small Islands, Rising Seas

Growing Authentic Leaders from Communities Most Impacted by Environmental Injustice and Climate Change

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On this week’s show, our hosts Rebecca Hardin, Whitney Smith and Nicholas Bruscato discussed Growing Authentic Leaders from Communities Most Impacted by Environmental Injustice and Climate Change with the distinguished Dr. Robert Bullard – “The Father of Environmental Justice” and current Dean of the Barbara Jordan-Mickey Leland School of Public Affairs at Texas Southern University
What is Environmental Justice?
Environmental Justice is the fair treatment and meaningful involvement of all people regardless of race, color, national origin, or income with respect to the development, implementation, and enforcement of environmental laws, regulations, and policies (Environmental Protection Agency, 2015).
The Principles of Environmental Justice can be viewed here

Continue reading Growing Authentic Leaders from Communities Most Impacted by Environmental Injustice and Climate Change

Agroecology

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Dr. Marney Isaac, University of Toronto

It is 2015 and we are back! To kick off the new year on It’s Hot in Here, our hosts Rebecca Hardin and Sam Molnar discussed Agroecology with Dr. Marney Isaac, Assisant Professor and Canada Research Chair in Agroecosystems & Development at the University of Toronto.

Bio: Dr. Marney Isaac, Assistant Professor and Canada Research Chair in Agroecosystems & Development, conducts interdisciplinary research on plant strategies and the nutrient economy of agroecological systems while concurrently charting the human dimension of agroecosystem management. Her research provides mechanistic insights into the ecological principles, nutrient cycles, and plant-soil interactions that govern the structure and function of agricultural landscapes, with particular attention on identification of strategies for environmental services, system resilience and sustainable livelihoods. Her research approach makes use of a diverse set of technical tools and employs various temporal and spatial scales: from mechanistic manipulative trials at the rhizosphere scale to large agroecosystem dynamics. She also supervises an international research program investigating agrarian management networks and environmental governance, with an emphasis on understanding innovation in large social-agroecological systems. She has published widely in environmental science, agronomic and multi-disciplinary journals including Agriculture, Ecosystems & Environment, Agronomy for Sustainable Development and Ecology and Society.

Here is her website: http://blog.utsc.utoronto.ca/misaac/


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In addition to agroecology, we followed up with the SNRE MS students after their trip to Peru for the international climate negotiations at the United Nations Conference of Parties (COP20) in Lima, Peru. The SNRE students that we had on the show included second-year graduate students from the School of Natural Resources and Environment COP20 student delegation. We discussed their exciting experiences at one of the most prominent climate talks in the world.

Our show this week maintained a theme of innovation and taking new approaches to protect the environment and manage land. This segment was a wonderful start to the new year and we are excited for all that 2015 has to offer.

Climate Week!

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This week on It’s Hot in Here, we discussed the upcoming international climate negotiations at the United Nations Conference of Parties (COP20) in Lima, Peru. On the show we had second-year graduate students from the School of Natural Resources and Environment COP20 student delegation: Katie Browne, Lexi Brewer, Arman Golrokhian, and (from the IHIH family) Pearl Zeng. Our guests talk about what the COP conferences are all about and how this year’s COP will be different from past years. We learn from fellow students about how they will be involved in COP20 and how they will stay engaged with the U-M community during their time in Peru. Continue reading Climate Week!

Environmental Contamination in Iraq

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We start off the show with an old feature, “What’s in season?”, and discussions of kale, squash, fresh herbs and even some late-season tomatoes! Sam Molnar, second-year Environmental Informatics and Environmental Justice master’s student at the School of Natural Resources and Environment, joins us for the show and tells us about a vegan squash soup he made recently. Sam lets us in on his recipe (that sounds amazing) so as Rebecca advised us, “squash soup it up, people!” Continue reading Environmental Contamination in Iraq