Tag Archives: University Of Michigan

Food, Love, and Money

In this episode, we spoke with movers and shakers in Southeast Michigan’s local food and land conservation scene.  With the 8th Annual Homegrown Local Food Summit recently behind us, we discussed its growth over the years, and its developing importance to the community.  Lindsey Scelera shared with us some of this year’s food victories as well as the victories that have come about in years past, including current Ann Arbor staples like Mark’s Carts.  Keith Soster tells us more about U-M’s goals for locally sourced food and what they’re doing to get there, as well as how students can get involved.

There are many ways to access and start making a difference for a more food sovereign Ann Arbor, with more just access for everyone, such as the UM Sustainable Food Program, volunteering through WWOOFing, the Michigan Young Farmer’s Coalition and more.

We also learned about the importance of preserving Michigan farmland and helping our threatened farmers with succession and business planning to hand their farms off to the next generation of food growers, instead of losing them to development. Legacy Land Conservancy is just beginning a program called FarmNext to accomplish just that.

Join Keith Soster, Director of Student Engagement for UM Dining Services, Robin Burke, Land Protection Manager at Legacy Land Conservancy, Lindsey Scalera, MI Farm to Institution Campaign Manager from the Ecology Center, Nathan Wells, Master’s Candidate and food warrior at SNRE, and your hosts, Andrea Kraus and Alex Truelove for the love of food.

Diversity Matters: The State of the Environmental Movement

This week, in honor of Martin Luther King Day, “It’s Hot in Here” brings you in-depth discussion of the state of diversity in the environmental movement and the University of Michigan. We kicked off the show with a brief review of the findings of the recently released report, “The State of Diversity in Environmental Organizations: Mainstream NGOs, Foundations, and Government Agencies,” spearheaded by Dr. Dorceta Taylor (SNRE) and the Green 2.0 Working Group.

Guests Beatriz Canas and Samantha Shattuck talk us through the implications of the report’s conclusion that, despite increasing racial diversity in the US, minorities remain underrepresented across the spectrum of environmental organizations. As a result, diversity tends to decrease as responsibility increases, with the “Green Insiders Club” remaining overwhelmingly white. Continue reading Diversity Matters: The State of the Environmental Movement

Ceci n’est pas une négociation du climat: the COP Paris Climate Talks

 

This week’s show gave our listeners insight into the 21st Conference of Parties (COP21), a conference of world leaders under the United Nations Framework Convention on Climate Change (UNFCCC). Our hosts, Harry Rice, Ed Waisanen, Bailey Schneider, and Rebecca Hardin were joined in studio by members of the University of Michigan Climate Change Delegation and the ground control team that’s supporting them at the climate negotiations in Paris. We were also joined by V Epshteyn and Ellen Loubert from UM Divest and Invest to hear about some local action that is taking place on the University of Michigan campus and in Ann Arbor.

COP 21 just wrapped up its first week in Le Bourget, Paris and will extend until December 11. The goal of the conference is to reach a legally binding and universal agreement to combat climate change and reduce greenhouse gas emissions to limit global warming to 2°C above pre-industrial levels. Over 50,000 participants including government leaders, environmental advocates, NGOs, UN agencies, and academics will be in attendance.

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The Michigan Team heading to COP 21

The participants are categorized as negotiators or delegates. Ten University of Michigan and faculty members will participate as delegates. The UM delegates are given the duty to report on what happens at the conference and to ensure that the negotiations are transparent. The UM delegation is part of an elite group of universities that can attend the COP conference. You can follow them on twitter.  Continue reading Ceci n’est pas une négociation du climat: the COP Paris Climate Talks

Growing Authentic Leaders from Communities Most Impacted by Environmental Injustice and Climate Change

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On this week’s show, our hosts Rebecca Hardin, Whitney Smith and Nicholas Bruscato discussed Growing Authentic Leaders from Communities Most Impacted by Environmental Injustice and Climate Change with the distinguished Dr. Robert Bullard – “The Father of Environmental Justice” and current Dean of the Barbara Jordan-Mickey Leland School of Public Affairs at Texas Southern University
What is Environmental Justice?
Environmental Justice is the fair treatment and meaningful involvement of all people regardless of race, color, national origin, or income with respect to the development, implementation, and enforcement of environmental laws, regulations, and policies (Environmental Protection Agency, 2015).
The Principles of Environmental Justice can be viewed here

Continue reading Growing Authentic Leaders from Communities Most Impacted by Environmental Injustice and Climate Change

Climate Change in 2014, Tu B’shevat, and SNRE’s Food Olympics

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On this week’s show, we discussed current environmental news, climate change with Alexandra (Lexi) Brewer (MS ’15), Tu B’shevat (Birthday of Trees) with Nick Bruscatto (MS ’16), and the SNRE Food Olympics with Rebecca Baylor. We also discussed the upcoming and exciting events happening around SNRE and the University of Michigan!

Continue reading Climate Change in 2014, Tu B’shevat, and SNRE’s Food Olympics

Ecotourism

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Today’s show features Jimmy Chin, renowned North Face team Climber and Photographer, Will Weber, Founder of Journeys International and Returned Peace Corps Volunteer, and Benjamin Morse, SNRE MSc. student (2016) and Returned Peace Corps Volunteer.

Continue reading Ecotourism

Agroecology

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Dr. Marney Isaac, University of Toronto

It is 2015 and we are back! To kick off the new year on It’s Hot in Here, our hosts Rebecca Hardin and Sam Molnar discussed Agroecology with Dr. Marney Isaac, Assisant Professor and Canada Research Chair in Agroecosystems & Development at the University of Toronto.

Bio: Dr. Marney Isaac, Assistant Professor and Canada Research Chair in Agroecosystems & Development, conducts interdisciplinary research on plant strategies and the nutrient economy of agroecological systems while concurrently charting the human dimension of agroecosystem management. Her research provides mechanistic insights into the ecological principles, nutrient cycles, and plant-soil interactions that govern the structure and function of agricultural landscapes, with particular attention on identification of strategies for environmental services, system resilience and sustainable livelihoods. Her research approach makes use of a diverse set of technical tools and employs various temporal and spatial scales: from mechanistic manipulative trials at the rhizosphere scale to large agroecosystem dynamics. She also supervises an international research program investigating agrarian management networks and environmental governance, with an emphasis on understanding innovation in large social-agroecological systems. She has published widely in environmental science, agronomic and multi-disciplinary journals including Agriculture, Ecosystems & Environment, Agronomy for Sustainable Development and Ecology and Society.

Here is her website: http://blog.utsc.utoronto.ca/misaac/


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In addition to agroecology, we followed up with the SNRE MS students after their trip to Peru for the international climate negotiations at the United Nations Conference of Parties (COP20) in Lima, Peru. The SNRE students that we had on the show included second-year graduate students from the School of Natural Resources and Environment COP20 student delegation. We discussed their exciting experiences at one of the most prominent climate talks in the world.

Our show this week maintained a theme of innovation and taking new approaches to protect the environment and manage land. This segment was a wonderful start to the new year and we are excited for all that 2015 has to offer.

Growing Our Native Knowledge

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“It doesn’t take much reading about current events to find articles detailing the plight of migratory songbirds and butterflies like monarchs. Due to a variety of circumstances, but especially the loss of suitable feeding and breeding habitat, numbers have dropped significantly and there is no reason to believe that that course will be reversed unless we do something about it.

Fortunately, individual property owners can do something about it. Using a variety of trees, shrubs and herbaceous plants in your yard will help to provide resting and feeding spots for these critters, even if your yard is small. Continue reading Growing Our Native Knowledge

Dance & Divest for Mother Earth

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To many Native Americans, the spring and summer months are known as powwow season–celebratory gatherings in which people come together to dance, sing, socialize, and honor Native cultures. Brittany Anstead and Hayden Hedman, two SNRE students and active members of the Native American Students Association at the University of Michigan, helped organize the 42nd Annual Dance for Mother Earth Pow Wow, taking place April 5th and 6th at Skyline High School. Brittany and Hayden offer up a delightful overview of what the event will entail, including dance contests, a fashion show, and lots of fry bread! Continue reading Dance & Divest for Mother Earth

Interview With Ian Makowske

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Ian Makowske, lifelong competitive gymnast and SNRE master’s student, takes us behind the scenes of the upcoming NCAA Men’s Gymnastics Championships. Not only will the University of Michigan be hosting the event for the first time in 40 years, it’ll be the first time ever that the gymnastics championships go “zero waste”. Ian explains what exactly that means and offers us some insight into the incredible amount of organizing and planning that went into making it happen. Continue reading Interview With Ian Makowske